For men over 40 and women over 30, you are estrogen dominant unless proven otherwise. Also chronic stress disturbs hormonal balance. These imbalances cause weight gain, fatigue, mood disorders and immune dis-regulation and more. We provide salivary hormone testing and urinary neurotransmitter testing to access hormonal neurotransmitter balance. Hormones affect your risk of prostate and breast cancer, blood sugar levels, inflammation, weight gain, depression, bone loss, loss of libido, sleep disorders, etc. Neurotransmitter imbalances affect many mental disorders including ADD, depression, irritability and sleep problems. For more information see http://www.labrix.com

Why use saliva testing?

(Courtesy of Labrix.com)

Appreciating the reliability of saliva testing is based on understanding the difference between steroid hormones in saliva and in serum. This difference is based on whether or not the hormones are bound to proteins in the medium used for testing. The majority of hormones exist in one of two forms: free (5%) or protein bound (95%). Only the free hormones are biologically active, or bio-available, and available for delivery to receptors in the body. Protein bound hormones do not fit the receptors and are considered non-bioavailable. When blood is filtered through the salivary glands, the bound hormone components are too large to pass through the cell membranes. Only the unbound hormones pass through and into the saliva. Saliva testing measures the bioavailable hormone – the clinically relevant portion delivered to the receptors in the tissues of the body.

Salivary hormone levels are expected to be much lower than serum levels, as only the unbound hormones are being measured. When healthcare providers measure serum hormone levels and prescribe hormone replacement therapy based on those results, patients are often overdosed. If the patients are then tested using saliva, the results are extraordinarily high and create confusion resulting from a lack of correlation between the two methods.This discrepancy becomes especially important when monitoring topical, or transdermal, hormone therapy. Studies show that this method of delivery results in increased tissue hormone levels (thus measurable in saliva), but no parallel increase in serum levels. Therefore, serum testing cannot be used to monitor topical hormone therapy.

Saliva measures the “unbound” biologically active or free hormone levels in the body:When blood is filtered through the salivary glands, the bound hormone components are too large to pass through the cell membranes of the salivary glands. Only the unbound hormones pass through and into the saliva. What is measured in the saliva is considered the “free”, or bioavailable hormone, that which will be delivered to the receptors in the tissues of the body.

Serum measures the “protein bound” biologically inactive hormone levels in the body:In order for steroid hormones to be detected in serum, they must be bound to circulating proteins. In this bound state, they are unable to fit into receptors in the body, and therefore will not be delivered to tissues. They are considered inactive, or non-bioavailable.

Only saliva testing measures topically dosed hormones:The discrepancy between free and protein bound hormones becomes especially important when monitoring topical, or transdermal, hormone therapy. Studies show that this method of delivery results in increased tissue hormone levels (thus measurable in saliva), but no parallel increase in serum levels. Therefore, serum testing cannot be used to monitor topical hormone therapy.

Why test neurotransmitter levels?

(Courtesy of Labrix.com)

Neurotransmitters are the brain chemicals that facilitate the transmission of signals from one neuron to the next across a synapse. Neurotransmitters work with receptors in the brain to influence and regulate a wide range of processes such as mental performance, emotions, pain response and energy levels. Functioning primarily in the Central Nervous System (CNS), neurotransmitters are the brain’s chemical messengers, facilitating communication among the body’s glands, organs, and muscles. Numerous clinical studies have shown that inadequate neurotransmitter function has a profound influence on overall health and well-being. In fact, imbalances in certain neurotransmitters are associated with most of the prevalent symptoms and conditions seen in practitioners offices today.

  • Mood disorders; depression, anxiety
  • Adrenal dysfunction; fatigue, insomnia
  • Loss of mental focus; ADD, ADHD, cognitive fog
  • Addiction and dependency
  • Hormonal imbalances; E2 dominance, E2 deficiency, low androgens
  • Loss of appetite control; insulin resistance

Compounding these symptoms of imbalance are the myriad of bioactive substances like caffeine, alcohol and nicotine and many of the medications used to manage these conditions as well as some cholesterol lowering medications. These substances and medications can contribute to neurotransmitter depletion and resulting symptoms by suppressing or artificially stimulating neurotransmitter receptor function.

When functioning properly the neurotransmission system has natural checks and balances in the form of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters. These are classified according to their effects on postsynaptic membranes (receptor sites). Excitatory neurotransmitters cause depolarization of the membrane and promote an action potential. Inhibitory neurotransmitters cause hyperpolarization and depresses or inhibit an action potential.

Putting It All TogetherIdentifying and managing neurotransmitter imbalances is facilitated with a noninvasive urinary test. Testing provides a tool to understand each patient’s specific neuroendocrine imbalances, which can be corrected with nutraceuticals, BHRT, diet, and lifestyle interventions.

Information on this website identifies numerous symptoms and conditions associated with neurotransmitter imbalances. It is especially important to understand that there are agonistic/antagonistic interrelationships of the neurotransmitters with adrenal hormones and sex hormones. Changes in sex hormones and adrenal hormones can lead to neurotransmitter imbalances. And at the same time, neurotransmitter imbalances will affect hormone production and function. Testing both neurotransmitters and hormones provides a comprehensive view of the body’s functional neuroendocrine status, and brings to light additional factors that may be contributing to symptoms.